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A Consequential Brainstorm #IWSG #amwriting

[I wrote this post as a member of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our worries and also offer support and encouragement to each other on the first Wednesday of every month. If you’re a writer like me and you’re looking for a bit of support, you can click the link and sign up here]

This month’s awesome Co-Hosts feature other fabulous writing friends with me:

C. Lee McKenzie, Lisa Buie-Collard , Sadira Stone, and Patricia Josephine.  

Check out our IWSG homepage for recent news and events.  And as always, thank you to founder Alex J. Cavaugh 🙂 

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"The beginning of knowledge is the discovery of something we do not understand." Frank Herbert.

The weirdest google discovery I ever made was the existence of bizarre planets held in a tidal lock to their star. One side always faces their star and the other side is permanently without that light and heat. These planets look exactly like their names—Eyeball planets.

Twilight areas truly exist. Ice and perpetual night are at 180 degrees of the planet, darkening the backside of the eyeball appearance while clouds and vapor create light and white uncertainty like an eye.

And there are tons of them.

My favorite discovery is how some of the hotter planets may fade toward the center, some sort of midpoint area, cooling with the mix of night on the other side of the world, which, may resort in water through the midline. Water aids life. Could potential life exist in this mid ring? Scientists aren’t sure, but the idea of life on these strange planets is very intriguing.

And just to remind you, I’m no scientist, so this post is all my interpretation of the Youtube surfing I’ve done.

This month, the IWSG question of the month asked: “What’s the strangest thing you’ve ever googled in researching a story?”

I hope my answer was a little interesting to you too.

Other news?


My busy home and career life haven’t changed. I have little time to market or think outside of my writing, but I’m writing, a little each day. I’m also working with an exceptional writing coach.  I’ve slowed down my manuscript and am working with her, thrilled with our once a month correspondence. It’s been the most fantastic experience. I’m growing in ways I never imagined.

So what am I reading?

I just finished one of the best trilogies I’ve come across in a long time. A page turner series I couldn’t put down: The Chemical Trilogy by Lauren DeStefano. If you like YA and untraditional futuristic possibility, you’ll like this one.

So Happy IWSG Day everyone 🙂 Keep Dreaming. Keep Plotting. Just don’t stop because of the struggle 🙂

IWSG VI: When Research Turns Scary, How Do You Sleep?

IMG_4156 [I wrote this post as a member of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group where we share our worries and also offer support to each other on the first Wednesday of every month. If you’re a writer like me and you’re looking for a bit of support, you can click the link and sign up here]

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I sat at my kitchen table just the other night, flipping through a couple of different research books I’d ordered from the library.

* Note the photo to the side, Exhibit A: my kitchen table, my I-Pad, my son’s dinosaur pen, and my favorite purple notebook. The stack of books you see in the picture is one of two stacks.

I had just read through an entire introduction on benevolent spirits and first hand accounts from a demonologist when my heart sped up. I glanced from wall to wall, back over my shoulder, listening for any unusual sounds in my house.

Is it real? I wondered.

Part of being a writer for me, is the ability to feel and see things as if I’d actually been through them. My body certainly believed whatever I was reading was very real in the moment. And when my cat turned the corner in the kitchen, just a moving shadow in the corner of my eye, well, he scared the holy Moses out of me.

Research can be a wonderful thing. In science, it gives you the what’s been done, the next questions, basic facts and formulas to use as a foundation. In writing, I follow the same steps to bridge the histories with whatever world is stirring in my own mind.

Then the fears kick in.

I admit, I was the kid with my head in my own mother’s lap at the movie theater after I’d begged to see Aliens 2 with her and my brother. “No mom! I’m not too little! I’ll watch the whole movie, I swear!”

Wrong.

I, again, was the little girl too scared to walk across the floor in the basement, seeing imaginary JAWS coming out from under the couch hungry to eat me. So I jumped from couch to couch to the stairs if I ever had to go down the basement for who knows how many months.

Research is critical, and I thought I grew up. I thought I could wear an investigative hat this time.

So I face a dilemma. Finish the research, or manage my heart rate so I can sleep. Last week, I think I went three or four days wondering what was really hiding in the shadows late at night. Every groan in the house, every little shifty shape on the walls or the carpet set my imagination into a full on sprint.

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Exhibit B: The shadow stalking cat, Mr. Maverick.

Sigh. I have to finish this book though. After a week of rest from my research I am finally sleeping again. But I have to go back.

Question: Ever been there? I’d love to hear how you manage to sleep and research scary things.

Thank you 🙂

And a big thank you to this month’s hosts:

Lauren Hennessy
Lisa Buie-Collard
Lidy Wilks
Christine Rains
Mary Aalgaard